The Happy Sorceress

valentinovamp:

Happy Easter!!! <3 <3 <3

Menu

Growing up, holiday meals were always hosted by my grandparents.

And when I say ‘grandparents’, what I really mean is my Grammy did all the cooking and cleaning and my Grampa would read the paper or watch game show reruns.

Easter, traditionally, would mean a ham. Spiked with cloves (I hated the taste of clove on my ham, back when I was still an omnivore). Potatoes, usually mashed. Sometimes ‘cottage’. There might be yams. Rolls, of course. A bean salad. Possibly made with several kinds. Another dish involving fruit cocktail and Miracle Whip (‘ambrosia’, if I recall correctly). 

Very home-y. Always lots to eat, with family showing up around noon and staying…well, sometimes through the evening. 

They’re both gone now, I haven’t been back to Apokolips in almost ten years and I avoid Darkseid like the…well, like the evil overlord she is.

It’s just the three of us and my in-laws for holiday meals now, a sharp reduction from the 20 or more that would spill in and out of Grammy and Grampa’s house. 

The menu is very different, too.

This year, it’s an appetizer of Pizza with Za’atar, Preserved Lemons and Ricotta, then Steamed Globe Artichokes with Pecorino Vinaigrette and Fried Garlic Chips, Asparagus-Gruyere Tart, Grilled Lamb Chops (or a faux ‘lamb’ for the vegetarians) with Nigella’s Mint Sauce and a Milk Chocolate-Pistachio Tart for dessert.

It will also be quieter, and the house won’t have that ‘Gah - too many bodies/I’m overheated!’ feeling.

Odd how I kind of miss that part.

absorbashield:

magictransistor:

Gustave Doré, Samson destroying the Temple of Dagon (Woodcut engraving), c. 1865.

Oh man, party foul.

absorbashield:

magictransistor:

Gustave Doré, Samson destroying the Temple of Dagon (Woodcut engraving), c. 1865.

Oh man, party foul.

absorbashield:

thebristolboard:

Original mailing envelope illustration by Jack Kirby and Mike Royer from Jack Kirby’s Gods Portfolio, published by Communicators Unlimited, 1972.

What did… what did I come into this room for… 

absorbashield:

thebristolboard:

Original mailing envelope illustration by Jack Kirby and Mike Royer from Jack Kirby’s Gods Portfolio, published by Communicators Unlimited, 1972.

What did… what did I come into this room for… 

mayakern:

seasonal fashion according to me

god i hate summer

I hate it here in the South. 

Growing up in PA, it was fine. Bay Area (CA) was great. Here? HUMIDITY. Always and forever. 
I dieeee…

davestokes:

Tonight’s Game of Thrones sketch, Eddard Stark, think I prefer the pencils. 

brianmichaelbendis:

Something different this week: X-WEAR THROUGH THE AGES!

Prints at Society6!

alexsegura:

Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, Dark Passage, 1947

alexsegura:

Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, Dark Passage, 1947

archiemcphee:

This awesome sculpture is a fully-functioning pipe organ made of 250 empty Pringles cans. It was created by Brooklyn-based mixed-media artist collective Fall On Your Sword, who explain that their inspiration for the project came from the organ seen in The Goonies.

Will Bates, cofounder of Fall On Your Sword, explains how the Pringles organ works:

"We built ten keys below the organ’s pipes by connecting the cans to springs. Pushing a key triggers a tone, causing air generated by hidden fans within the tubes to flow out of the pipes at the top of the organ. "We want the piece to feel like a real instrument, so the tones will be based on manipulated recordings of organ tones and resonances played through the cans themselves. Participants can make up their own tune, and have their own unique experience with the piece."

Click here for video of the Pringles organ in action.

[via Junkculture]